Dean Cain shot to fame playing Superman in the much-loved TV series Lois & Clark, but has spent much of his subsequent career in SyFy Channel B-movies like Dragon Fighter, Dark Descent, Post Impact and Dead And Deader. On the set of his latest low budget genre outing, Maneater, Cain was candid in telling Total Sci-Fi’s Marc Shapiro why he makes so many low-budget genre B-movies, before reminiscing about his years on Lois & Clark.

Why do you make so many B movies?

First of all, let’s not forget that I have my own production company and had a pretty good run with Ripley’s Believe It Or Not. The reason I do so many low budget films is that, for the most part, I can get in and out in a couple of weeks. I usually don’t have to be too far from home and am around to watch my kid grow up.

I could have made the choice of being one of those actors who pursues big pictures. I would end up going all around the world and working up to six months on a movie and being away from my kid. I’m not that kind of actor. I’ve chosen a more balanced lifestyle for myself and it definitely works. I can do what I want when I want. And I know people are quick to put down SyFy Channel movies but they’re fun to watch and they’re definitely fun to do.

So you’re a big fan of science fiction and not just a mercenary who just does it for the bucks?

I love doing science fiction. For me those are the cool things to do. I love to pretend. I love the sense of hyper reality I get when I’m doing a science fiction or fantasy film.

Even the real low budget stuff like, say, Maneater for instance?

Maneater was a good script, a fun script, your basic creepy campfire story. And this is the kind of character I don’t often play. He’s a little off and just might be a killer. But he’s off for all the right reasons. Certainly that was a big part of the attraction for me.

It’s a totally escapist kind of film. You have the monster, the hot teens and the flawed hero. It’s the perfect movie for sitting around on a Saturday night with a few beers.

Which brings us to your big showbiz break, starring as Superman in Lois & Clark: The New Adventures Of Superman…

That show broke me and I’ll always be grateful for the opportunity. But it was a real grind. I was in every episode and in just about every scene. It seemed like I was always working 18 hour days, going home and getting a few hours sleep and then having to be back at the set. That show burned me out for a very long time.

Lois & Clark was very much a show that hinged on the audience buying into the concept.

Definitely. From the very first episode you had to buy into the fact that Lois could not tell that Clark was really Superman with glasses on. If you couldn’t do that, then there was really no reason to watch the show.

Could the show have ultimately been more groundbreaking then it turned out to be?

There was always the notion that Lois and Clark would start having kids and that the show would have to deal with all of that. I thought that would have been the greatest thing but we never really got to that point.

The show could have been great if they had a kid. That’s what I was trying to get them to do during the last year of the show. My attitude was ‘Well what are the rules? Can we make up our own rules?’ They could have had a kid and, all of a sudden, that kid could have been 12 years old and there would have been a whole different storyline going on that would have taken the show in a whole different direction.

There have been several theories put forth over the years as to why Lois & Clark was cancelled after four seasons. What’s the truth?

We had already been picked up and were ready to go into a fifth season when Teri [Hatcher] got pregnant and that was it. I can’t say I was too upset. I was ready to be done. I had no life while I was on that show. It had all become too much.

What do you think of the incarnations that followed Lois & Clark, specifically Smallville?

Smallville has obviously found a niche and is doing very well. Clearly the show is much different than anything we did. It’s not really Superman but I guess, in a sense, it is. I did a guest shot in the episode of Smallville in 2007 called Cure and it was great not being the guy who had to super speed into a scene.

And what did you think of Superman Returns?

It was a beautiful film to look at but I was confused by a lot of the things they did. I know just about everything there is to know about Superman and I think Brandon did a great job playing the role. The movie had moments where it was just humming along and then it had moments where it was really clunky.

Is it a stretch of significant proportions to speculate about whether you might play Superman again?

Who knows? I would never say never. I don’t feel old and I can still move around just fine. But I suppose if I were going to play Superman again, I would have to get back in the gym. Because that costume was nothing but a pair of tights.

Maneater will be released soon.

Source : http://totalscifionline.com/interviews/4419-dean-cain-the-man-of-steel

 


 

Dean Cain: l'Homme d'Acier

Dean Cain est devenu célèbre pour son rôle de Superman dans la série Lois & Clark, qui a séduit toute une génération de fans. Il a passé de nombreuses années de sa carrière subséquente dans des films de série B du genre SyFy Channe comme ''Dragon Fighter'', ''Dark Descent'', ''Post Impact'' et ''Dead And Deader''.  Sur le plateau de son dernier film, ''Maneater'', Cain a été bon joueur et a discuté avec Marc Shapiro de Total Sci-Fi’ de ses choix de carrière, à savoir tourner dans des films de série B, avant de faire un retour sur ses années de ''Lois & Clark''.

Pourquoi faites-vous tant de films de série B ?

Tout d'abord, il ne faut pas publier que j'ai ma propre compagnie de production et que j'ai eu pas mal de succès avec ''Ripley’s Believe It Or Not''. La raison pour laquelle je fais tant de films à petit budget est que, en grande partie, je peux m'absenter quelques semaines à la fois seulement.  Habituellement, je n'ai pas à être bien loin de la maison et je suis là pour mon fils.

J'aurais pu faire le choix d'être un de ces acteurs qui ont une grande carrière cinématographique. Je voyagerais aux quatre coins de la planète et je serais amené à travailler six moins sur un même film et je ne pourrais pas voir grandir mon enfant. Je en sus pas ce genre d'acteur. J'ai choisi un style de vie plus équilibré et ça fonctionne très bien pour moi. Je peux faire ce que je veux quand je le veux. Je sais que les gens jugent rapidement les films diffusés sur la chaîne SyFy, mais ils sont plaisants à regarder et à tourner aussi.

So you’re a big fan of science fiction and not just a mercenary who just does it for the bucks?

I love doing science fiction. For me those are the cool things to do. I love to pretend. I love the sense of hyper reality I get when I’m doing a science fiction or fantasy film.

Even the real low budget stuff like, say, Maneater for instance?

Maneater was a good script, a fun script, your basic creepy campfire story. And this is the kind of character I don’t often play. He’s a little off and just might be a killer. But he’s off for all the right reasons. Certainly that was a big part of the attraction for me.

It’s a totally escapist kind of film. You have the monster, the hot teens and the flawed hero. It’s the perfect movie for sitting around on a Saturday night with a few beers.

Which brings us to your big showbiz break, starring as Superman in Lois & Clark: The New Adventures Of Superman…

That show broke me and I’ll always be grateful for the opportunity. But it was a real grind. I was in every episode and in just about every scene. It seemed like I was always working 18 hour days, going home and getting a few hours sleep and then having to be back at the set. That show burned me out for a very long time.

Lois & Clark was very much a show that hinged on the audience buying into the concept.

Definitely. From the very first episode you had to buy into the fact that Lois could not tell that Clark was really Superman with glasses on. If you couldn’t do that, then there was really no reason to watch the show.

Could the show have ultimately been more groundbreaking then it turned out to be?

There was always the notion that Lois and Clark would start having kids and that the show would have to deal with all of that. I thought that would have been the greatest thing but we never really got to that point.

The show could have been great if they had a kid. That’s what I was trying to get them to do during the last year of the show. My attitude was ‘Well what are the rules? Can we make up our own rules?’ They could have had a kid and, all of a sudden, that kid could have been 12 years old and there would have been a whole different storyline going on that would have taken the show in a whole different direction.

There have been several theories put forth over the years as to why Lois & Clark was cancelled after four seasons. What’s the truth?

We had already been picked up and were ready to go into a fifth season when Teri [Hatcher] got pregnant and that was it. I can’t say I was too upset. I was ready to be done. I had no life while I was on that show. It had all become too much.

What do you think of the incarnations that followed Lois & Clark, specifically Smallville?

Smallville has obviously found a niche and is doing very well. Clearly the show is much different than anything we did. It’s not really Superman but I guess, in a sense, it is. I did a guest shot in the episode of Smallville in 2007 called Cure and it was great not being the guy who had to super speed into a scene.

And what did you think of Superman Returns?

It was a beautiful film to look at but I was confused by a lot of the things they did. I know just about everything there is to know about Superman and I think Brandon did a great job playing the role. The movie had moments where it was just humming along and then it had moments where it was really clunky.

Is it a stretch of significant proportions to speculate about whether you might play Superman again?

Who knows? I would never say never. I don’t feel old and I can still move around just fine. But I suppose if I were going to play Superman again, I would have to get back in the gym. Because that costume was nothing but a pair of tights.

Maneater will be released soon.

Source : http://totalscifionline.com/interviews/4419-dean-cain-the-man-of-steel